Emblem of Sudan

Sudanese Lifestyle

Welcome to the Embassy of the Republic of Sudan, London

Sudan’s interim constitution of 2005 stipulates that the Republic is based on multiplicity of religions and cultures and is an all-encompassing country. The State, which was founded on justice, equality and promotion of human rights, is committed to respecting and safeguarding human dignity.

These rights which include:

  1. Life and dignity of the human being
  2. Individual freedom
  3. Freedom from slavery and bondage
  4. Equality before law
  5. Women and child rights
  6. Immunity against torture
  7. Just trial
  8. The right of litigation
  9. Restriction of capital punishment
  10. Right to privacy
  11. Right of belief and worship
  12. Right of expression and information
  13. Right of gathering and organization
  14. Right of franchise
  15. Freedom of movement and domicile
  16. Right of ownership
  17. Right of education
  18. Right of the handicapped and old age
  19. Public Health Care
  20. Ethnic and Cultural minority rights
  21. Sanctity of these rights and freedoms

The constitutional and competent courts uphold and protect provided therein and further monitored by the Human Rights Commission.

Sudanese Music

Sudan’s "whirling dervishes" are famed throughout the world for their spell-binding dances, in which they are accompanied by rhythmic drumming, as they gradually work themselves into a trance. Dervishes are Muslim devotees.
Popular music has had a rather chequered history in recent years, with many artists becoming exiles after the government stamped down on their freedom to perform. Lyrics are all-important in Sudanese music, with new words often made up on the spot for a special occasion such as a wedding. Traditional instruments include tom-toms, rababas (viol-like stringed instruments with a hide-covered body), and the oud (a lute).

Modern and Contemporary Art

The oldest and most consistent of Sudanese modern and contemporary art is the art of the tribes.

The Sudanese tribal life has always been the least responsive to change. Art of the tribes of the Sudan shows great reservation and conservatism.

An art of such continuity clearly exposes the spirit of such tribal cultures. In fact the richness of the Sudanese art is in its diversity.

This entire heritage, past and present, constitutes the base on which the modern Sudanese artistic practices are deeply grafted. This is why Sudanese contemporary art, stands out among the different African schools of art as unique.

This entire heritage, past and present, constitutes the base on which the modern days of Islam in Sudan. It is traditional Qoranic School. Which continued to exist from as early as the 9th century AD until the present day? It teaches art as a practice, but not as an objective. Yet its artistic impact on the Sudanese child seems to be important.

When the Turks invaded Sudan in 1824, Mohamed Ali Pasha, who was very keen on the modernization of the Nile Valley, introduced the Modern Elementary Education, yet he based the experience on the traditional (khalwa) school.

In 1936, a department of art education was established in Bakht-el-Rida Institute of Education. The department was headed by Jean Pier Greenlow a British artist and art teacher he went into history as the founder of the modern art movement in Sudan. Since the pioneering efforts of Greenlow in 1936, Sudanese art has in fact developed into a relatively strong cultural medium of expression.

The change came when some of the pioneer graduates of Gordon Memorial College went overseas for further studies. But they soon came to discover that the works of art could only exist between the old and new, between convention and revolution within a certain society. This is why some pioneer artists where culturally frustrated in Europe. They naturally failed to be part of the European mainstream art. They started to drift away from it, and began to try things on their own.

So the Sudanese artists returned to Khartoum to face their own culture and to practice art as a socio-cultural activity. The Sudanese contemporary society is complex, plural and draws from many different traditions and visual styles. Hence what was called latter (Khartoum School) in the 60s, was in fact a forum for the struggle to capture the spirit and perspective of, not only Africa but the Islamic World also. Because both worlds make the cultural reality of Sudan, a reality of unity and diversity.

Contemporary Sudanese art world did not experience a war of styles, or strong schools other than (Khartoum School). Nevertheless, there is a relatively strong art movement, which is highly experimental. In its own way this movement is modernist and seeking to globalize in spite of the rather restrictive conditions under which hundreds of Sudanese artists are working.
If serious art can be defined as the art that does not have an obvious commercial orientation. Then we can say there is serious art today in Sudan. If you happen to be in Khartoum, then you must look around to see its art.

Arts and crafts
Many crafts are available in Sudan’s souks (markets). Strings of heavy beads often include antique trading beads made from colored glass. The traditional wraps in bright, printed cotton, worn by women, are mostly imported.

Many traders make their goods in the marketplace: old tin cans are cut and soldered into cooking pans and lamps; tailors make up the loose white gowns worn by men; and leather is punched and stitched into bags and saddles for donkeys and camels.

 

 

Ambassador Mohammed Abdalla Ali Eltom

“Mr. Eltom has been in the Foreign Service for nearly 28 years.”He served in various regions in the world where he held positions in Sudan Embassies in the Middle East in Amman-Jordan, Damascus-Syria and Abu-Dhabi-UAE.”.

“He then served in Sudan’s Embassy in Washington DC where he was selected by the Foreign Ministry to be within the diplomatic staff that re-inaugurated the Embassy after a period of closure.”

Sudan Embassy, London

Sudan Embassy, 3 Cleveland row,
St. James's, London SW1A 1DD

Job Vacancies at the Embassy.

Watch out for any vacancies that may be announced.

Sports

Sudanese were acquainted  with sports since ancient times when they practiced I many types of sport such as horsemanship, swimming and wrestling...etc. during the colonial rule. Different sporting disciplines were organized by the formation of specialized clubs. Presently there is a wide range of sporting activities and facilities available throughout the country.

Needless to say, football is the most popular sport in Sudan and enjoys the unbound enthusiasm and support of fans and media. The major sporting clubs and teams in Khartoum are Hilal, Mareikh and Morada. Other states in Sudan have their own sporting clubs. Almost all types of sport activities in addition to football are encouraged and supported by sports clubs.

Football

Football is the most popular sport in Sudan. Even in remote villages in the desert, children gather together for a game. Sudan won the African Cup of Nations back in 1970, but has not been so successful in recent years.

Sudanese People

Sudan’s interim constitution of 2005 stipulates that the Republic is based on multiplicity of religions and cultures and is an all-encompassing country. The State, which was founded on justice, equality and promotion of human rights, is committed to respecting and safeguarding human dignity.